Use of fine quality natural water from 130 meters deep underground

Water quality is the key ingredient for making great sake.
Chichibuyama is a mountain that was formed by tectonic activities under the sea.
The rain water that falls on the soil of Chichibu takes several decades to pass through the mountain to turn into fine quality water.



Mikadomatsu pumps water from 130 meters deep underground and this water has been used as their source of sake production.
This natural water full of minerals accelerates the growth of yeast, and creates Mikadomatsu's uniquely "rounded" flavour and aftertaste.

Source of Rice

Sake is made of rice, but the rice used to make sake is bigger in size than the usual rice that you usually come across to eat. A special kind of rice known as "Shuzo Kotekimai" is used for sake production.
The rice we eat is made of brown rice of which 7 to 8% has been shaved off. However, at our brewery, for example, we use "Yamada Nishiki", a type of rice that is shaved by at least 30% from it's original size.
The Daiginjou, a type of Japanese sake which we submit to the National Sake Awards Competition, must use rice that has been shaved by over 50% from it's original form. shaved by at least 30% from it's original size.
There is a lot of protein on the surface of the rice and this creates bitterness when turned into sake.
Therefore, the surface of the rice must be shaved off in order to produce a fragrant and delicious sake with a natural aromatic scent.

Source of Rice Source of Rice Source of Rice

Well Managed Fermentation Process

Well Managed Fermentation Process

The fermentation tank which manages the fermentation process is the most important stage of sake production.
It is made of a dual structured duct and on the outer layer runs cold water.
This structure carefully controls the temperature, maintaining the quality of the sake during the fermentation process.
In the past, wooden tubs were used creating inconsistencies in the taste of the sake.
Depending on the type of sake, fermentation usually takes approximately 50 days from yeast production.
"Moromi", a white cloudy sake base is formed in the final fermented mixture that ultimately the sake is pressed from.

Pressing Machine (Yabuta Style)

Pressing Machine

In the past, the fermented "Moromi" was inserted in a linen pouch and was placed on top of one another underneath a heavy pressing stone to make the sake.
However, this traditional process causes the moromi to get in contact with air, and the beautiful and clear scent, unique to high quality sake to dis appear.
Our brewery uses a massive filter shaped pressing machine to overcome this challenge.
This pressing machine is composed of alternate aluminum and rubber boards, and hydraulic pressure prevents the moromi from spilling out.
When the moromi passes through this alternate aluminum and rubber boards, they press the moromi without it getting in contact with any air.
Freshly pressed sake and high quality sake such as Gijyoushu are immediately refrigerated, and other types of sake are stored in the warehouse to await for maturity.

Two Types of Bacteria Forming Sake

Two key types of bacteria are required to produce sake.
They are "kouji" and "yeast".
Kouji is a type of fungus which helps to transform the rice starch into sugar.
Yeast eats on the sugar produced by the kouji to create the alcohol and tasty component of the sake.
Controlling the "kouji" and 'yeast' is the secret to making great sake.
※When yeast and kouji are broken down into alcohol, carbon dioxide gas is released.
You would know if you've tried newly created sake, because this is why newly created sake is carbonated.

Two Types of Bacteria Forming SakeTwo Types of Bacteria Forming SakeTwo Types of Bacteria Forming Sake
Two Types of Bacteria Forming SakeTwo Types of Bacteria Forming SakeTwo Types of Bacteria Forming Sake